Fiji Island Turtles

Here, I decided to make a small selection of photographs and descriptions of the inhabitants of the Red Sea …

For many of those who call these waters “fish soup” and not seeing “point blank” the diversity and individuality of each individual underwater inhabitant may be useful. Look at the “big and small”, colorful and “gray”, aggressive and timid sea “residents.” Perhaps the next time you dive in these places, they will not seem to you “soup” …

Common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiohs trancatus).

Despite their name, they are “not ordinary”. In any case, almost everyone who has been lucky enough to swim with “the good men carrying the wind” in their natural habitat think so.

This is how we, once again lucky, after the “deep training” on Um Gamaar, were met by a flock of dolphins on the transition to Shabruhr Um Gamaar.

In general, dolphins are mammals of the order Whales, belong to toothed whales. The body shape of the dolphins, perfectly adapted for life in the aquatic environment. They can reach speeds of up to 40 km per hour. Their brain is much larger than that of a human, and it is no less difficult to arrange … They meet one by one or in large enough flocks. We had to see flocks of more than a hundred individuals (and read that there are packs and several thousand each).

There are curious and sociable. Sometimes, it is possible to attract the attention of a dolphin, making various sounds underwater, which is what divers use.

In the Red Sea region there are two types of dolphins. These are the common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiohs trancatus) and the long-nosed bucket (Stenella Longirostris) mentioned above …

If anyone is interested, then HERE, you can read "TDI Brief History"

In the Red Sea many species of moray eels live. They are: Giant moray, Yellowheaded morey, Yellowmouth morey, Undulate morey, White dragon (Zebra morey), White-eyed moray (Zebra morey), White-eyed moray (Dragon), -eyed morey), Pepper Moray (Peppered morey), Cellular Moray (Honeycomb morey), Yellowcock Moray (Yellow-edged morey) and there are several other species that I have never seen before, and certainly not photographed …

Already from the name it is clear that the largest of them is the Giant Moray. It reaches up to three meters in length. Lives at depths from 10 to 50 meters. Occurs in shallow lagoons and on the outer walls of reefs. Like all moray eels, it is a night predator.

In adult moray eels of this species, the entire body is covered with “leopard” spots. Characterized by a large dark spot in the region of the gill opening. Like all members of this family, has a charming “smile” – flat teeth with sharp edges in a row and long canines in the middle. This “fish” was first seen by me in the Sharm El Nagi region, during my first dive in the Red Sea in 1993. Its dimensions were maximum, my impressions of what I saw, the same …

Pepper Moray, one of the “favorite” moss fish. That there is only one “tattooed” head of this “Pork”.

The size, however, the predator “did not come out”, the length is up to 38 cm. Lives near the surface and to a depth of 40 meters. Several similar “persons” live on Fanadir, Rosalie Muller also had to meet. You never know where …

Very cute Squishy moray eel. He lives in caves in pairs or one by one … Already from the name, it is clear – her mouth has yellow color from inside. The size of these “moors” is up to 180 cm. The photo shows a “young” yellow-headed moray eel …

Bluespotted stingray.

Probably one of the first, they are noticed by the OWD classes in these waters, “kneeling” next to their instructor, novice divers. A sort of “pancake in the blue spot” … In fact, it is a stingray, referring to the caudal.

Rays – tails – night predators. They feed on hermit crabs, worms and shrimps. During the day, they can often be seen in the sand near the walls of the reefs, in a partially buried state or under corals. It does not apply to shy fish, but after seeing a scuba diver tries to “get out of the way”. A great “object” for a novice underwater photographer. That’s just not to forget about the spike on his tail …

Sea turtles.

Almost all the life of turtles is in the water. Only during the time when they lay their eggs, turtles come ashore. Having dug up a “native” beach (turtles lay eggs in the same place where they were born themselves) a hole, turtles lay there from 60 to 150 eggs. Then diligently bury them in the sand. Now it has to be two months before the solemn appearance of the small turtles from the “incubator” …

Fiji Island Turtles

Unfortunately, only a few of them live to “adult” age, becoming food for seabirds, lizards and other predators, including people who are not indifferent to meat and turtle eggs …

The most common in the Red Sea are two species of tortoise. These are the Green turtle (Green sea turtle) and the Biss (Hawksbill sea turtle). They feed on turtles with sponges, ascidians, squid, fish, jellyfish, and crabs. And green turtles also eat seaweed …

Two species of octopus inhabit the Red Sea. These are the Red Octopus (Big red octopus) and the Long-Legged Octopus (White-spotted octopus). The red octopus (Big red octopus) can grow up to 140 cm.

Its “primary” color is Purplish Brown, but it can change it with ease, depending on the “emotional” state and “mood”. The octopus show activity at night, and during the day they hide in the crevices of the reef. However, juvenile octopuses, sometimes, can be seen in the daytime – they are less secretive. Eat molluscs and crabs …

Crayfish squid – Sepiotheus (Bigfin reef sguid)

Length up to 35 cm. Has a long cigar-shaped body, with fins along the edge. The squid’s head is small, with big eyes. It lives in the depth range – from the surface to 100 meters.

Squids are active nocturnal. Squid bodies shimmer with all the colors of the rainbow. Especially, it is noticeable at night, in the light of underwater lights. A similar glow of firework colors is achieved through the direct control by squid of various types of pigment cells that can stretch and shrink. It is believed that such lightning in changing color is used by them to communicate …

Blowfish (Tetraodontidae).

The fish is rather big, it reaches a length of 120 cm. It lives practically from the surface-5 m. To 60 meter depth. Adult arotrons live on reefs with caves and large sponges. In general, where you can find shelter. But they are also found on the sandy bottom of reef banks. For example, I photographed this arotron on the sand plateau of the Fanadir Reef.

In general, the Pufferfish is a large family of about 20 genera and 100 species, divided into two subfamilies. Short-winged puffers have an interesting ability to “inflate” with water or air, like a ball for scaring predators.

Many species of puffers have spines and thorns, have poisonous mucus on the skin containing tetrodotoxin. All this makes sedentary fish “difficult” prey for predators …

The puffer themselves feed on invertebrates, mainly echinoderms.

Look at the “teeth” of the star Arotron in the photo – impressive. Apparently he perceived me as a threat to his security and tried to scare him away by all available means. And he inflated, and “clapped” his teeth, and “growled” (later I will set up the video) …

Masked puffer (Masked puffer).

Sizes – up to 30 cm. It lives from 2 to 30 meters depth. Already from the name it is clear that floating in the “mask” …

Spiny Arotron (Whitespotted puffer).

Length up to 35 cm. Occurs on a sandy bed between reefs or in thickets of sea grass. It has characteristic white circles around the eyes and pectoral fins …

I really like this fish for photographing. We call them affectionately “pokemon”. It dwells at shallow depths and up to 90 meters inclusively (to the question of technical diving and “what do you see there?”).

Usually found alone. They feed on benthic invertebrates with strong shell. For these purposes, they use their powerful dental plates, which, like the Iglobryukhovs, grow together in front and resemble a “beak”.

Long-haired fish (Porcupinefish).

Length up to 70 centimeters. The range of depths of habitat from 5 to 65 meters. It feeds on gastropods and bivalve mollusks …

Striped Ugrehvost (Striped eel catfish).

In fact, this is somiki. True, small – only up to 32 centimeters long. Unlike other types of catfish that live mainly in fresh water, these babies are marine inhabitants.

Fiji Island Turtles

Very often, scuba divers encounter juveniles of Ugkhvostov, huddled together in a flock near the sandy bottom on the reef. Adults, stay alone. During the day they hide, hunt crustaceans, mollusks and fish at night …

Often, the kind of “harmless” small fish scurrying over the white sand in the clear water of shallow water gives some woeful naturalists the illusion of the “softness and fluffiness” of these fish. But it is better not to touch these “malyavok” hands. Somiki have very poisonous sharp needles of the pectoral and dorsal fins.

Injections of these needles are very painful. Poison, even, can be deadly … (This poison, like the poison of many marine life is destroyed by heat).

Dark soldier fish (Giant squirrelfish).

This is not a very large red sea fish, lives in the depth range from 5 meters to 120. The soldier reaches the size of 45 centimeters. The long thorn on the gill cover is poisonous.

Sometimes, the meat of this “externally edible” fish can be poisonous. This is due to the fact that in some areas, “soldiers” feed on single-celled algae that release toxins.

Fish soldiers are nocturnal, and during the day they hide in the shade under reef ledges.

Red Sea Amphiprion (Red Sea anemonefish).

Very common and famous view. However, after the Disney cartoon of the same name, many European divers began to call Amphiphrions – “Nemo fish”. And in my opinion, “amphiprion” sounds more beautiful …

Amphiphones live in pairs or family groups in sea anemone. These fish are real couch potatoes and do not like to move far from their home-sea anemone.

Actinia, with its clinging tentacles, protects amphipriones from predators. In turn, Rybka themselves, developed immunity to the venom of stinging cells, their protector. Interestingly, during spawning, the female lays eggs near the sea anemone, but not in the zone of direct contact. Later, both the male and the female, taking the tentacles of the anemone in the mouth, “teach” the offspring to the venom of stinging cells, passing them along the roe. Thus, embryos develop immunity to poison …

Amphiphrions very actively protect their home-actinia from external invasions. Moreover, no matter what size the “potential invader”. If the diver gets too close (face) to their sea anemones, the brave fish will beat the scuba mask masks into the glass until they “chase the attacker” …

Actually, the Oman and North Indian amphiphones live in the Red Sea …

Heilins (Cheilinae)

Napoleonfish (Napoleonfish)

Yeah, big fish. The weight of adults reaches 190 kilograms. It feeds mainly on clams.

Scuba divers “love” to feed these sociable giants with boiled eggs. Adults have a characteristic frontal protrusion. The photographs show how mobile the jaw of the Napoleons is. I personally was very surprised by the “mimicry” of the handsome.

Filamentous wart (Red Sea Walkman – “Red Sea pedestrian”).

An interesting fish, belonging to the family of scorpion (scorpaenidae), reminded me of the Miracle of the whale fish from the tale of the Humpbacked Horse. Warthogs, like this fantastic character, have “growing trees” on their backs and tails – processes that resemble coral twigs. Eyes high “planted” – apparently the fish likes to disguise, buried in the sand. It was interesting to watch the needlefish swim up very close to the mouth of our beauty (Red Sea Walkman), and then, slipping between her eyes, hid in the processes on the tail …

The English name of the wart is pedestrian. The fish justifies it, as it uses the lower rays of the pectoral fin, externally resembling claws, for “walking”. There are even traces on the sand after this pedestrian’s “walk” …

Wartholes have poisonous needles on the fin fin … When the fish was tired of our presence, it began to bounce threateningly on the spot, turning its back towards me and spreading the brightly colored surface of the pectoral fins …

In general, scorpion (scorpaenidae), a large enough family. It includes almost ten subfamilies, one of which is the Pryoinae.

These are both Common Lionfish and Russell’s Lionfish (Russells Lionfish) – very similar to the “zebra”, but leading to the deep-sea “living”, and the radiant Lionfish (Clearfin Lionfish).

Lionfish – night hunters. Often, during night dives, one can observe how they hunt in packs, forcing small fish (for example, paraprianthuses (Yellow sweeper)). This hunt is similar to a wolf pack hunt …

In the morning, having been satiated, the lionfish descend to the bottom and into the crevices under the corals, where they “sit out” all day long.

Poisonous needles of fins of krylatok, this weapon of self-defense. But sometimes this self-defense becomes “too active.” Especially at night … So you can observe how outwardly “slow and sad” the fish begins to actively attack an overly annoying diver, bristling poisonous needles in his direction …

During the night dives, you can watch another entertaining scene. If you slightly fall behind the group of divers, swimming with the lights on above the sandy bottom and turning off your lamp (forgive me for PADI and “concepts”), then you can see the winged sailing. They seem to be catching up with the “face where light is replaced by a shadow.” There is a feeling that night hunters are trying to overtake swimmers, following them under the cover of darkness …

Used underwater photos of Konstantin Nekrasov.

In general, we are engaged not only and not so much by taking pictures of “fish” and other “sea lads”. So, if you decide – go “at the light” …

For those interested, we also conduct recreational PADI and SDI courses at all levels …

Well, if, as part of the “entertaining” diving, you are already “cramped” – welcome to the TDI technical courses.

Those who wish to join our travels, study programs or just dive in a good company can contact me by phone: +7 921 796-11-36 (in St. Petersburg)

or by phone: + 3 725 986 33 99 (in Egypt)

or e-mail: club @

As always, the trainings are conducted by the instructor-trainer TDI / SDI N 8528 Konstantin Nekrassov.

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