Checklist of Domestic Violence

Snow and Sorensen conducted a study on the ritual abuse of children in five separate neighborhoods. Surveyed 39 children aged 4 to 17 years. Four of the five districts identified three components of sexual abuse: incest, deprivation of virginity, and adult groups. sex. Finkelor and others conducted a study of sexual abuse in American day care centers. Over the three-year period, they identified 1,639 victims of sexual violence in 270 day care centers. They noticed that 13% of cases could be attributed to ritual violence. Kelly studied the effects of sexual and ritual violence in these centers. Compared to the victims of sexual violence, children subjected to Satanic rituals “experienced significantly more types of sexual violence”, received more serious physical. injuries and, like rape victims, survived the “extreme scare due to threats made by criminals”. Kelly found that ritual violence was characterized by a significantly higher average number of victims per day care center and a significantly higher average number of perpetrators per victim. “The children were afraid that supernatural forces, such as Satan, would always know where they were and what they were doing.”

Checklist of Domestic Violence

Therapeutic issues

K. Gould notes that children who are victims of ritual abuse rarely themselves report the incident and do so for three reasons. These children are often subjected to drugs before the ritual. Hypnosis is often used to induce amnesia in a post-hypnotic state or to induce suicidal behavior when the episode of violence is remembered. The episode of violence is so painful that dissociation often occurs. The combination of these three factors in ritual abuse of children under six years old often creates “amnesic barriers” that make spontaneous disclosure of the incident unlikely.

Checklist of Domestic Violence

Gould razrab. a checklist of signs and symptoms of ritual abuse of children, including 12 categories: a) sexual behavior and perceptions; b) use of the toilet and bathroom; c) supernatural powers, rituals, occult symbols, religion; d) narrow spaces or body binding; e) death; e) doctor’s office; g) certain colors; h) food intake; i) emotional problems, in particular those associated with speech, sleep and study; k) family relations; l) the game and relationships with peers; m) other fears, relationships, disclosures and strange ideas. The recommended form of therapy is “a combination of play therapy and the disclosure by the child of the fact of violence to the therapist and parents (in cases where violence occurs outside the family)”. The therapist must actively structure the therapeutic activities and ensure the child’s motivation to address issues that would otherwise be avoided. Game therapy should be adapted to the possible multiplicity of ritual violence. Gould stresses the need to take into account the four components of each traumatic incident, namely: a) behavior during an episode of violence; b) of emotions, to-rye experienced a child; c) sensations, including the ability to “bring to the surface, identify and survive damage to the body”, d) knowledge of the “meaning of the episode of violence for the child and for the criminal.”

Gould and Kozolino revealed 4 mental control programs, which are usually used by cult sects. They note that ritual violence is intended to cause dissociation, and its altered personalities, formed as a result, are then used in more brutal religious practices. This process is described as follows: by brutal violent actions, the victim is brought to a state of separation of emotions and cognitions, or, in another way, to a state of splitting, creating a negative “window”, in which the cult program is inserted, after which the violence stops, effectively closing the negative window. The cult program will now be permanently in place, remaining unconscious for the victim. These programs are as follows: a) programs for repeating a contact, when the candidate of law. the signal prompts the surviving victim to independently resume contact with the sect or to allow its member of the sect; b) programs of communication, when the victim, through the mouth of one of his modified (“other”) personalities, informs the sect of the necessary information from the sect .; c) programs of self-injury and suicide, which are included if the victim fails to comply with the requirements of the sect; d) programs of sabotaging treatment aimed at stopping the therapy that would free the victim from the influence of the cult sect.

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